The Internet - The first Worldwide Tool of Unification ("The End of History")

" ... Now I give you something that few think about: What do you think the Internet is all about, historically? Citizens of all the countries on Earth can talk to one another without electronic borders. The young people of those nations can all see each other, talk to each other, and express opinions. No matter what the country does to suppress it, they're doing it anyway. They are putting together a network of consciousness, of oneness, a multicultural consciousness. It's here to stay. It's part of the new energy. The young people know it and are leading the way.... "

" ... I gave you a prophecy more than 10 years ago. I told you there would come a day when everyone could talk to everyone and, therefore, there could be no conspiracy. For conspiracy depends on separation and secrecy - something hiding in the dark that only a few know about. Seen the news lately? What is happening? Could it be that there is a new paradigm happening that seems to go against history?... " Read More …. "The End of History"- Nov 20, 2010 (Kryon channelled by Lee Carroll)

"Recalibration of Free Choice"– Mar 3, 2012 (Kryon Channelling by Lee Carroll) - (Subjects: (Old) Souls, Midpoint on 21-12-2012, Shift of Human Consciousness, Black & White vs. Color, 1 - Spirituality (Religions) shifting, Loose a Pope “soon”, 2 - Humans will change react to drama, 3 - Civilizations/Population on Earth, 4 - Alternate energy sources (Geothermal, Tidal (Paddle wheels), Wind), 5 – Financials Institutes/concepts will change (Integrity – Ethical) , 6 - News/Media/TV to change, 7 – Big Pharmaceutical company will collapse “soon”, (Keep people sick), (Integrity – Ethical) 8 – Wars will be over on Earth, Global Unity, … etc.) - (Text version)

“…5 - Integrity That May Surprise…

Have you seen innovation and invention in the past decade that required thinking out of the box of an old reality? Indeed, you have. I can't tell you what's coming, because you haven't thought of it yet! But the potentials of it are looming large. Let me give you an example, Let us say that 20 years ago, you predicted that there would be something called the Internet on a device you don't really have yet using technology that you can't imagine. You will have full libraries, buildings filled with books, in your hand - a worldwide encyclopedia of everything knowable, with the ability to look it up instantly! Not only that, but that look-up service isn't going to cost a penny! You can call friends and see them on a video screen, and it won't cost a penny! No matter how long you use this service and to what depth you use it, the service itself will be free.

Now, anyone listening to you back then would perhaps have said, "Even if we can believe the technological part, which we think is impossible, everything costs something. There has to be a charge for it! Otherwise, how would they stay in business?" The answer is this: With new invention comes new paradigms of business. You don't know what you don't know, so don't decide in advance what you think is coming based on an old energy world. ..."
(Subjects: Who/What is Kryon ?, Egypt Uprising, Iran/Persia Uprising, Peace in Middle East without Israel actively involved, Muhammad, "Conceptual" Youth Revolution, "Conceptual" Managed Business, Internet, Social Media, News Media, Google, Bankers, Global Unity,..... etc.)



Etiquette mavens say the book on manners must be rewritten, literally, to take into
account new technologies and social media (AFP Photo/Ed Jones)

A 2012 survey by Intel found that in several countries, a majority said they were put
off by "oversharing" of pictures and personal information on the
internet and smartphones (AFP Photo/Nicolas Asfouri)

Honouring computing’s 1843 visionary, Lady Ada Lovelace. (Design of doodle by Kevin Laughlin)
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Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Google, Facebook, Twitter Speak Out Against Egypt Internet Ban

Jakarta Globe, February 02, 2011   

Google, Facebook and Twitter, breaking with the usual practice of corporate silence, are speaking out forcefully against the Internet blockade by the Egyptian authorities.

Police beating a protester during clashes in Cairo. Google,
Facebook  and Twitter, breaking with the usual practice of corporate
 silence, are speaking out forcefully against the Internet blockade
 by the Egyptian authorities. (Retuers Photo/Amr Abdallah Dalsh)
    
As Egypt is rocked by continuing protests against President Hosni Mubarak, the three companies spawned by the Internet have criticized the attempt by the authorities to sever the nation of 80 million people from the Web.

While corporate responsibility has been a front-burner issue since companies were pressured into cutting ties with apartheid South Africa decades ago, experts said the statements and moves by the three Web giants were unusual.

“Usually with most corporations the issue is what’s going to make profits, not necessarily what’s going to do good for the world,” said Benjamin Hermalin a finance professor at the University of California, Berkeley’s Haas School of Business.

“Particularly given a situation of political uncertainty it would be very strange for companies to take bets on one side because if the other side wins they’re in deep trouble,” Hermalin said.

The uncertainty in Egypt did not stop Facebook, which had about five million active users in the country before the Internet shutdown, from issuing a statement saying that “no one should be denied access to the Internet.”

“Although the turmoil in Egypt is a matter for the Egyptian people and their government to resolve, limiting Internet access for millions of people is a matter of concern for the global community,” Facebook spokesman Andrew Noyes said.

Google and Twitter went considerably further than merely expressing concern, jointly creating a tool to allow Egyptians to bypass the Internet closure and post messages to Twitter by making telephone calls.

Google said the “Speak to Tweet” service, which turns voice messages into “tweets,” was aimed at “helping people in Egypt stay connected at this very difficult time.”

Google-owned YouTube also highlighted videos from Egypt on its news and politics channel, CitizenTube, invited users to submit their own and began streaming live coverage of broadcasts by the Al Jazeera television network.

Google also created a “Crisis Response” page featuring links to the “Speak to Tweet” tool, CitizenTube, emergency telephone numbers and Google Maps of where protests have been occurring in Egypt.

Michael Connor, editor and publisher of the online magazine Business Ethics, noted that Google, whose motto is “Don’t Be Evil,” has taken stands previously, refusing to censor Internet search results in China, for example.

At the same time, Connor said Google, Facebook and Twitter were also acting out of self-interest.

“The image of these companies is being open and being involved in the free exchange of information,” Connor said. “They had to do something. They’ve got a customer base that expects them to do certain things.”

Timothy Fort, professor of business ethics at George Washington University and executive director of the Institute for Corporate Responsibility, agreed that Internet freedom is “core to their identity.”

“In distinction with an established company that does earth-moving, say, or dam-building the identity of Google, Facebook and Twitter is the free flow of information,” Fort said. “That is their business.

“It is very much in their corporate interest to be forcefully aligning themselves with that,” he said.

Although a Google executive has gone missing in Egypt, Hermalin said Internet companies are better placed to speak out than a company such as Coca-Cola, which needs to protect its employees in a particular country.

“Internet companies are kind of a new breed of company,” Hermalin said. “They have global reach but almost zero assets on the ground.”

Coca-Cola, however “could really be hurt,” Hermalin said.

“Let’s suppose that Mubarak or allies of Mubarak retain control and Coke is out there handing out free Cokes to the demonstrators,” he said.

“What’s the first thing they’re going to do? They’re going to punish Coke like crazy, they’re going to nationalize their bottling plants,” he said.

“And if Coke is seen as someone who’s going to use its assets to help overthrow dictators then other places in the world that have dictators are going to say ‘Maybe having Coke around is not such a good idea.’”

For Google, Facebook and Twitter, the positive publicity they get from standing up to the Egyptian authorities “more than makes up for the risks to whatever business they have in Egypt,” he said. 

Agence France-Presse

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