The Internet - The first Worldwide Tool of Unification ("The End of History")

" ... Now I give you something that few think about: What do you think the Internet is all about, historically? Citizens of all the countries on Earth can talk to one another without electronic borders. The young people of those nations can all see each other, talk to each other, and express opinions. No matter what the country does to suppress it, they're doing it anyway. They are putting together a network of consciousness, of oneness, a multicultural consciousness. It's here to stay. It's part of the new energy. The young people know it and are leading the way.... "

" ... I gave you a prophecy more than 10 years ago. I told you there would come a day when everyone could talk to everyone and, therefore, there could be no conspiracy. For conspiracy depends on separation and secrecy - something hiding in the dark that only a few know about. Seen the news lately? What is happening? Could it be that there is a new paradigm happening that seems to go against history?... " Read More …. "The End of History"- Nov 20, 2010 (Kryon channelled by Lee Carroll)

"Recalibration of Free Choice"– Mar 3, 2012 (Kryon Channelling by Lee Carroll) - (Subjects: (Old) Souls, Midpoint on 21-12-2012, Shift of Human Consciousness, Black & White vs. Color, 1 - Spirituality (Religions) shifting, Loose a Pope “soon”, 2 - Humans will change react to drama, 3 - Civilizations/Population on Earth, 4 - Alternate energy sources (Geothermal, Tidal (Paddle wheels), Wind), 5 – Financials Institutes/concepts will change (Integrity – Ethical) , 6 - News/Media/TV to change, 7 – Big Pharmaceutical company will collapse “soon”, (Keep people sick), (Integrity – Ethical) 8 – Wars will be over on Earth, Global Unity, … etc.) - (Text version)

“…5 - Integrity That May Surprise…

Have you seen innovation and invention in the past decade that required thinking out of the box of an old reality? Indeed, you have. I can't tell you what's coming, because you haven't thought of it yet! But the potentials of it are looming large. Let me give you an example, Let us say that 20 years ago, you predicted that there would be something called the Internet on a device you don't really have yet using technology that you can't imagine. You will have full libraries, buildings filled with books, in your hand - a worldwide encyclopedia of everything knowable, with the ability to look it up instantly! Not only that, but that look-up service isn't going to cost a penny! You can call friends and see them on a video screen, and it won't cost a penny! No matter how long you use this service and to what depth you use it, the service itself will be free.

Now, anyone listening to you back then would perhaps have said, "Even if we can believe the technological part, which we think is impossible, everything costs something. There has to be a charge for it! Otherwise, how would they stay in business?" The answer is this: With new invention comes new paradigms of business. You don't know what you don't know, so don't decide in advance what you think is coming based on an old energy world. ..."
(Subjects: Who/What is Kryon ?, Egypt Uprising, Iran/Persia Uprising, Peace in Middle East without Israel actively involved, Muhammad, "Conceptual" Youth Revolution, "Conceptual" Managed Business, Internet, Social Media, News Media, Google, Bankers, Global Unity,..... etc.)



Etiquette mavens say the book on manners must be rewritten, literally, to take into
account new technologies and social media (AFP Photo/Ed Jones)

A 2012 survey by Intel found that in several countries, a majority said they were put
off by "oversharing" of pictures and personal information on the
internet and smartphones (AFP Photo/Nicolas Asfouri)

German anti-hate speech group counters Facebook trolls

German anti-hate speech group counters Facebook trolls
Logo No Hate Speech Movement

Honouring computing’s 1843 visionary, Lady Ada Lovelace. (Design of doodle by Kevin Laughlin)

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

'Like' me, 'like' me: Cambodian PM woos youth vote online

Yahoo – AFP, Suy Se, January 18, 2016

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen (R) poses for a selfie with supporters during
 a ceremony marking the 37th anniversary of the fall of the Khmer Rouge regime
in Phnom Penh (AFP Photo/Tang Chhin Sothy)

Looking more avuncular than authoritarian, Cambodian premier Hun Sen crouches for a selfie for his Facebook page with young scouts -- part of a social media blitz selling the strongman's cuddlier side as he seeks to extend a 30-year grip on power.

The 63-year-old, a wily political survivor who defected from the Khmer Rouge to oversee Cambodia's rise from the ashes of war, has vowed to remain prime minister until he is 74.

To do so he will need the support of Cambodia's youth -- a tech-savvy demographic whose votes may well be decisive in the next election, slated for 2018.

Two thirds of Cambodia's 15 million population are aged under 30. Like their contemporaries everywhere they are avid users of social media -- a sphere Hun Sen has until recently viewed with suspicion.

In 2013, young Cambodians voted in droves for the opposition, wearied by the endemic corruption, rights abuses and political repression seen as the hallmarks of Hun Sen's rule.

A self-confessed digital dinosaur, Hun Sen has in recent months launched himself online with an arsenal of new media tools.

Cambodians hold their mobile phones displaying Facebook pages of Cambodian 
Prime Minister Hun Sen (top) and the opposition party leader Sam Rainsy (below)
 in Phnom Penh (AFP Photo/Tang Chhin Sothy)

He has just debuted a 'Hun Sen' App for Android and Apple phones -- complementing a new personal website -- to allow the public to "receive news about me quickly".

Meanwhile his official Facebook page, minted in September, already has more than 1.9 million 'likes'.

"Wherever technology goes, we must be there too," Hun Sen said recently, also revealing in a Facebook post that he carries five smart phones to stay connected with his countrymen.

Opposition leader Sam Rainsy, whose Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) say they were denied a majority in 2013 by vote rigging, has more than two million 'likes' on his official Facebook page and has long embraced social media to spread his message.

With under three years to the next election, the battle for power looks poised to play out online.

What's the game?

Sebastian Strangio, author of a recent book on the mercurial premier, says Hun Sen's belated embrace of technology once more illustrates the "tactical flexibility" which has kept him in power over the decades.

"Cambodia’s old political battles have simply shifted online," he added.

But Hun Sen's online forays have received a mixed reception from his target audience.

"Awesome for an ex-bumpkin... but nothing special for young generation Khmers! They were there long before him," one Facebook user posted in English on the premier's page.

Others say the strategy is working, bringing the premier into the daily lives of young people.

University student Kea Ny, 26, told AFP many of his peers have changed their attitudes on the back of his social media outreach work.

"Among 10 of my friends, seven of them support him now. Before they all had negative feelings towards the prime minister," he said.

Two thirds of Cambodia's 15 million 
population are aged under 30 and like
their contemporaries everywhere they 
are avid users of social media (AFP
 Photo/Tang Chhin Sothy)
While it good news for Hun Sen's social media team, critics say the move is merely another feint by a master manipulator renowned for cracking down on freedom of expression.

The former communist cadre already leans heavily on pliant courts and security forces to keep rivals in check.

His government is now pushing for a cybercrime law, which critics fear will be used to target dissent.

Rainsy is currently in self-exile after a slew of criminal charges were brought against him and other core CNRP officials, which they say are politically-motivated.

An opposition senator has been also arrested over posting a doctored treaty of a highly-sensitive border area with Vietnam on Facebook.

Rainsy has been charged with being accomplice in that case.

Fearing arrest over the post, three other members of Rainsy's social media team have fled Cambodia.

Others were not so lucky -- including those in the age range the ruling party hopes to woo.

In August, a 25-year-old student was charged with incitement to commit a crime over an alleged Facebook post calling for a "colour revolution" in the country.

Another 25-year-old was charged in early January for posting "insults and threats" on Hun Sen's Facebook page.

If convicted, he faces up to two years in jail.

"He (Hun Sen) is taking to social media to show his softer side," Cambodian political analyst Ou Virak told AFP.

"The sinister flipside is of course an increased monitoring of social media, epitomised by the cybercrime law."

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