The Internet - The first Worldwide Tool of Unification ("The End of History")

" ... Now I give you something that few think about: What do you think the Internet is all about, historically? Citizens of all the countries on Earth can talk to one another without electronic borders. The young people of those nations can all see each other, talk to each other, and express opinions. No matter what the country does to suppress it, they're doing it anyway. They are putting together a network of consciousness, of oneness, a multicultural consciousness. It's here to stay. It's part of the new energy. The young people know it and are leading the way.... "

" ... I gave you a prophecy more than 10 years ago. I told you there would come a day when everyone could talk to everyone and, therefore, there could be no conspiracy. For conspiracy depends on separation and secrecy - something hiding in the dark that only a few know about. Seen the news lately? What is happening? Could it be that there is a new paradigm happening that seems to go against history?... " Read More …. "The End of History"- Nov 20, 2010 (Kryon channelled by Lee Carroll)

"Recalibration of Free Choice"– Mar 3, 2012 (Kryon Channelling by Lee Carroll) - (Subjects: (Old) Souls, Midpoint on 21-12-2012, Shift of Human Consciousness, Black & White vs. Color, 1 - Spirituality (Religions) shifting, Loose a Pope “soon”, 2 - Humans will change react to drama, 3 - Civilizations/Population on Earth, 4 - Alternate energy sources (Geothermal, Tidal (Paddle wheels), Wind), 5 – Financials Institutes/concepts will change (Integrity – Ethical) , 6 - News/Media/TV to change, 7 – Big Pharmaceutical company will collapse “soon”, (Keep people sick), (Integrity – Ethical) 8 – Wars will be over on Earth, Global Unity, … etc.) - (Text version)

“…5 - Integrity That May Surprise…

Have you seen innovation and invention in the past decade that required thinking out of the box of an old reality? Indeed, you have. I can't tell you what's coming, because you haven't thought of it yet! But the potentials of it are looming large. Let me give you an example, Let us say that 20 years ago, you predicted that there would be something called the Internet on a device you don't really have yet using technology that you can't imagine. You will have full libraries, buildings filled with books, in your hand - a worldwide encyclopedia of everything knowable, with the ability to look it up instantly! Not only that, but that look-up service isn't going to cost a penny! You can call friends and see them on a video screen, and it won't cost a penny! No matter how long you use this service and to what depth you use it, the service itself will be free.

Now, anyone listening to you back then would perhaps have said, "Even if we can believe the technological part, which we think is impossible, everything costs something. There has to be a charge for it! Otherwise, how would they stay in business?" The answer is this: With new invention comes new paradigms of business. You don't know what you don't know, so don't decide in advance what you think is coming based on an old energy world. ..."
(Subjects: Who/What is Kryon ?, Egypt Uprising, Iran/Persia Uprising, Peace in Middle East without Israel actively involved, Muhammad, "Conceptual" Youth Revolution, "Conceptual" Managed Business, Internet, Social Media, News Media, Google, Bankers, Global Unity,..... etc.)



Etiquette mavens say the book on manners must be rewritten, literally, to take into
account new technologies and social media (AFP Photo/Ed Jones)

A 2012 survey by Intel found that in several countries, a majority said they were put
off by "oversharing" of pictures and personal information on the
internet and smartphones (AFP Photo/Nicolas Asfouri)

German anti-hate speech group counters Facebook trolls

German anti-hate speech group counters Facebook trolls
Logo No Hate Speech Movement

Bundestag passes law to fine social media companies for not deleting hate speech

Honouring computing’s 1843 visionary, Lady Ada Lovelace. (Design of doodle by Kevin Laughlin)

Friday, July 19, 2019

G7 ministers agree plan on digital tax but more work ahead

Yahoo – AFP, Stuart WILLIAMS, July 18, 2019

G7 ministers reached consensus on steps towards taxing the digital giants amid
differences between the US and France and Britain. (AFP Photo/ERIC PIERMONT)

Chantilly (France) (AFP) - Ministers from G7 top economies on Thursday reached consensus on steps towards an accord on taxing digital giants, an issue that has divided the United States and its allies Britain and France.

French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire, who hosted the two-day meeting in Chantilly outside Paris, hailed the consensus as unprecedented, although US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin insisted there was more work to be done.

The French parliament this month passed a law that would tax digital giants for income amassed inside a country even if their headquarters are elsewhere, a move the United States complained discriminated against US firms like Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon.

Britain has announced plans for a similar tax and the G7 meeting in the tranquil French town -- usually famed for its horses rather than horsetrading -- was dominated by tough talks to find some common ground.

Le Maire said finance ministers and central bankers had reached an agreement "to tax activities without physical presence, in particular digital activities."

"This is the first time that G7 members agree in principle on this," he told reporters.

'Minimum tax'

France issued a statement saying the G7 had agreed a two-pronged solution -- confirming the principle of companies being able to accrue revenues outside their legal base but also on a minimum tax to be agreed internationally for their activities.

Ministers "fully supported a two-pillar solution to be adopted by 2020", the statement said.

"Ministers agreed that a minimum level of effective taxation... would contribute to ensuring that companies pay their fair share of tax," it said.

A French official, who asked not to be named, said the tax rate would have to be agreed in the future.

Forecasts for revenue the French government expects from its tax on tech 
giants, which it has said it will drop if an international deal is implemented
(AFP Photo/Thomas SAINT-CRICQ)

German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz said he was happy with the "progress" achieved and in particular with the reference to the minimum tax level in the final statement.

Further talks would now be needed in the wider context of the G20 group of top economies for an international agreement which would be overseen by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

Scholz expressed hope that a full international consensus could be reached next year under the OECD.

'Step forward'

The French parliament's move infuriated President Donald Trump and the US had announced an unprecedented probe against France which could trigger the imposition of tariffs.

Mnuchin struck a slightly more cautious tone than his French counterpart Le Maire while making clear he was well satisfied with the talks.

"We made some significant progress at this meeting, there is more work to be done," Mnuchin told reporters, adding that ministers had made a "big step in the right direction".

He said the United States has "significant concerns" with the French law and planned British legislation and was pleased that both Paris and London would dump the domestic laws if an international agreement was forged.

"Everyone here wants to reach an acceptable international solution," said Mnuchin. "Creating certainty for global multinationals is very important," he added.

Tim Wach, managing director of global tax consultants Taxand, described the progress as "highly encouraging" and "significant steps" in building a fairer tax system.

“The G7 must avoid conflicting regimes across different countries," he said.

'Warning on Libra'

The G7 ministers had far less trouble agreeing a position on new cryptocurrencies such as Facebook's Libra, saying such new and untested digital money risked destabilising the international monetary system and were not ready to be implemented.

"They agreed that projects such as Libra may affect monetary sovereignty and the functioning of the international monetary system," the French statement said.

The other key issue at the meeting was finding a replacement for Christine Lagarde, who has led the International Monetary Fund since 2011 but has resigned to become head of the European Central Bank.

Le Maire's European colleagues at the G7 have decided he should lead the search for a candidate from Europe, although no shortlist has been fixed yet, said a European official.

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